Running the Human Race

Fatema Rasoli stand on a mountain top with arms streched out.

I run and run. Kilometre after kilometre. Higher and higher up the mountains. Top after top. Maybe in a desperate attempt to escape from memories that I have tried to suppress these last years. Memories that are coming back when seeing Talibans on the streets of Kabul and Afghanistan.

I was born under Taliban rule, but raised in a hopeful and developing Afghanistan. Seeing some photos and videos makes me feel powerless, sad and angry. Seeing my people falling from an airplane, being shot while trying to save their lives and women hiding at home too scared to go out. 

It reminds me of Afghanistan 1996-2001, even if the Talibans are trying to paint a gentle image of themselves this time. We are not allowed to forget those years of fear and let Afghanistan plunge back in time. The world is not allowed to abandon women, children and other vulnerable groups.

I continue running with a strange feeling in my stomach, making me feel sick. A feeling that has stayed for several days. I cannot repress news from my homeland Afghanistan, nor from Haiti or floods in Europe. People all around the world are suffering from war, ongoing conflicts and climate change. Millions of people don’t have enough food, and the water is scarce.
 
Today is World Humanitarian Day and the human race is on. The race for humanity is on. Time is running out for the most vulnerable people. “In the race against the climate crisis, we can’t leave anyone behind.” Let us put action behind the statement.

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